Hearing Loss can contribute to cognitive decline.

Age-related cognitive decline can negatively impact many aspects of hearing health care, including assessment, counseling, intervention, and outcome. Cognitive impairment can range from mild to severe, and affects memory, learning, and concentration. These types of impairments in older adults need to be recognized by family members and brought to the attention of those people who provide hearing technology.

Approximately 5.1 million Americans 65 years or older have Alzheimer's disease, which is one of the most well-known forms of cognitive impairment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), only 19 percent of adults aged 60 and older report memory loss or confusion to health care providers.  This  suggests that everyone over the age of 60 years have hearing screenings annually.  Poor hearing and or understanding are the greatest contributors to cognitive decline.

 

 

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Addressing Hearing Loss with an Aging Population

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Hearing Loss can contribute to cognitive decline.

Age-related cognitive decline can negatively impact many aspects of hearing health care....

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